• Enduring Issues Cards- Friday, January 25, 2019

    Students had classtime to work on the Enduring Issues cards that were assigned yesterday.  They are based on the notes called the Enduring Issues- Midterm Activity sheet, which also contains instructions for the Enduring Issues card.   Yesterday, each student drew an event from a hat for their topic and needs to create a 5x7 card to explain how that topic is an example of an enduring issue.  There can be many possible "right answers," for each event, but students need to explain how that event is a good example of the enduring issue that they chose.  We will continue working on these cards tomorrow.  They are due on Monday. 

    Students also have a crossword puzzle which includes many terms that may be on the midterm exam.  The puzzle is a regular homework assignment, is due on Monday, and will count in the 3rd marking period.

    The midterm is on Monday, January 28.  There is study material online if students wish to prepare for the midterm.

    Enduring Issues- Thursday, January 24, 2019

    We started the day by going over the test that students took yesterday.  They could not keep the tests yet because there are still some people who did not take it yet, but they were able to ask questions about anything that they missed.  

    We talked a little bit about what  to expect on the midterm, which is coming on Monday.  There is study material online if students wish to prepare for the midterm.

    We then discussed what Enduring Issues are.  They have a lot in common with themes ELA class.  They are big overarching topics that we talk about throughout the year.  Students took notes on the Enduring Issues- Midterm Activity sheet, which also contains instructions for the "Enduring Issues card".  Each student drew an event from a hat for their topic and needs to create a 5x7 card to explain how that topic is an example of an enduring issue.  There can be many possible "right answers," for each event, but students need to explain how that event is a good example of the enduring issue that they chose.  We will continue working on these cards tomorrow.  They are due on Monday.

    Students also have a crossword puzzle which includes many terms that may be on the midterm exam.  The puzzle is a regular homework assignment, is due on Monday, and will count in the 3rd marking period.

    5-Week Test- Wednesday, January 23, 2019

    We took our 5-week test today.  The test covers material from the last 5 weeks, or so, of class (which does stretch back to before Christmas break).  Specifically, it will be about the Revolutionary War, including its causes.  This test counts for 25% of the 2nd marking period grade and is unable to be retaken.

    The last day for any redos, retakes, or late work is Thursday, Jan. 24.  The midterm is on Monday, January 28.  There is study material online if students wish to prepare for the midterm.

    Students received a crossword puzzle today which includes many terms that may be on the midterm exam.  The puzzle is a regular homework assignment, is due on Monday, and will count in the 3rd marking period.

    Review for Test- Tuesday, January 22, 2019

    We went over the quiz from last week.  We also went over the homework from the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.  Answers for the homework can be found here: Answers for 1-4 -- Answers for 5-20.  

    We then reviewed for tomorrow's test.  We played both Quizlet Live and Kahoot.  The test covers material from the last 5 weeks, or so, of class (which does stretch back to before Christmas break).  Specifically, it will be about the Revolutionary War, including its causes.  Students should be reviewing their binders from binder page #45 on for this test.  Additional study material has been posted online on Mr. Frank’s website.  This test counts for 25% of the 2nd marking period grade and is unable to be retaken.

    The last day for any redos, retakes, or late work is Thursday, Jan. 24.  The midterm is on Monday, January 28.

    MLK Day, No school- Monday, Jan. 21, 2019

    Quiz and Binder Check- Friday, January 18, 2019

    We had our weekly quiz today, as well as a binder check (which also counts for a quiz grade).

    Students have a 5-week test coming next week, on Wednesday, January 23.  The midterm is on Monday, January 28.

    The End of the War- Thursday, January 17, 2019

    Mr. Frank collected the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet, which will be graded.

    We took our final notes about the American Revolution today, called The End of the Revolution.  We revisited topics we had touched on before that relate to the ending of the war- the Battle of Saratoga as a turning point, the training that Washington's soldiers got at Valley Forge, and the end of the major fighting at Yorktown.  These notes also looked at the provisions in the Treaty of Paris, 1783, which ended the war, granted American independence, gave the US land all the way to the Mississippi River, and also promised loyalists that they would be paid for their losses during the war (a promise that the new states broke).

    Students will have a quiz tomorrow and will also have a binder check tomorrow, which will count as a small quiz grade.

    Loyalists- Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019

    Yesterday, we had started a video about loyalists in the Revolution.  We continued to watch these clips from Canada: A People's History, and answered questions about the video as we went.   These loyalists from the beginning of English-speaking Canada.

    Homework due tomorrow, Jan 17- Read pp. 158-172, then do questions 9-20 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.  This entire packet should be done and will be collected tomorrow.

    Students will have a quiz coming this Friday, and will also have a binder check on that day, which will count as a small quiz grade.

    Patriots v. Loyalists- Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019

    We went over the answers to the questions from the Liberty's Kids episode that we watched yesterday.  We then discussed the differences between the terms "Patriot" and "Loyalist" as well as "Tory," and we completed a diagram that was meant to show that some names had positive connotations that you would use for yourself and some names had negative connotations that you would use for your enemy.  We saw that both the patriots and the loyalists were each less than half of the population of the colonies.  If time allowed, we then started a video about the loyalists, but we didn't get far in it and will do most of it tomorrow.

    Homework due Thursday, Jan 17- Read pp. 158-172, then do questions 9-20 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.  This entire packet should be done by that day.

    Liberty's Kids- "The First Fourth"- Monday, Jan. 14, 2019

    First, students went over the quiz that was taken last Friday and had a chance to answer any questions that they had about it.  Mr. Frank also checked the homework that was due today- questions 5-8 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.

    We finished up the notes on the "Declaration of Independence." We then watched an episode of Liberty's Kids called, "The First Fourth of July."  Students answered guiding questions about the episode as the watched.  We did not get a chance to talk about the answers, though, and will revisit this tomorrow.

    Homework due Thursday, Jan 17- Read pp. 158-172, then do questions 9-20 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.  This entire packet should be done by that day.

    Quiz and Declaration of Independence - Friday, Jan. 11, 2019

    We started with the weekly quiz, which covered the battles of the war (in "The Shot Heard Round the World" packet), along with John Locke, Tom Paine ("Men Who Influenced the Declaration of Independence."), and the start of our Declaration of Independence notes.

    We then continued to analyze the Declaration of Independence with the notes on the sheet called "Declaration of Independence."  We listed things that we knew that the colonies were mad about and saw how those things were included in the list of wrongs that the king had done.  These wrongs are the "evidence" to support the colonists' "claim" that they should be independent.  We will finish these notes on Monday.

    Homework due Monday, Jan 14- Read pp. 153-157, then do questions 5-8 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.

    Homework due Thursday, Jan 17- Read pp. 158-172, then do questions 9-20 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.  This entire packet should be done by that day.

    ELA MAP testing - Thursday, January 10, 2019

    Today, students took the ELA MAP test during their social studies period.   (Since most students take two periods to finish, they either started it in English class and finished it in social studies, or the started it in social studies and finished it in English.) 

    There is a quiz on Friday, which will cover the battles of the war (in "The Shot Heard Round the World" packet), along with John Locke, Tom Paine ("Men Who Influenced the Declaration of Independence."), and the start of our Declaration of Independence notes from yesterday.

    Homework due Monday, Jan 14- Read pp. 153-157, then do questions 5-8 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.

    Homework due Thursday, Jan 17- Read pp. 158-172, then do questions 9-20 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.  This entire packet should be done by that day.

    Declaration of Independence - Wednesday, January 9, 2019

    We started by discussing the basic information about the writing of the Declaration of Independence: 

    • Who wrote it? (Thomas Jefferson, with help from Ben Franklin and John Adams)
    • What did it do? (It declared independence.  It said the colonies were not controlled by Britain anymore and it explained why.)
    • Where was it signed? (Philadelphia, PA, in a building now called Independence Hall.)
    • When was it approved? (July 4th, 1776.  Not at the start of the war and not at the end of it.)
    • Why was it written? (To explain to the world what the colonies are doing.  They needed support from Americans AND from France and Spain)

    Students took these notes on a separate sheet of paper.  Going along with that, students also took notes on the sheet called "Declaration of Independence."  We broke down the first few sentences of the Declaration in order to parse what Jefferson's meant by these words.  We will continue with these notes on Friday after the quiz.  (On Thursday students will be taking the ELA MAP test in social studies).

    Homework due Monday, Jan 14- Read pp. 153-157, then do questions 5-8 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.

    Homework due Thursday, Jan 17- Read pp. 158-172, then do questions 9-20 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.  This entire packet should be done by that day.

    There is a quiz on Friday, which will cover the battles of the war (in "The Shot Heard Round the World" packet), along with John Locke, Tom Paine ("Men Who Influenced the Declaration of Independence."), and the start of our Declaration of Independence notes from today.

    Thomas Paine and Common Sense - Tuesday, January 8, 2019

     We continued in the notes called, "Men Who Influenced the Declaration of Independence."  We watched an episode of Liberty's Kids called "Common Sense."  The episode includes many quotes from the actual pamphlet- arguments that Paine made for independence- and students listened for them to fill them into our notes.  We discussed each one afterwards so that students could make sure that they understood each one.  

    Homework due Monday, Jan 14- Read pp. 153-157, then do questions 5-8 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.

    Homework due Thursday, Jan 17- Read pp. 158-172, then do questions 9-20 in the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet.  This entire packet should be done by that day.

    John Locke- Monday, January 7, 2019

    We went over the quiz from last Friday, and Mr. Frank collected the "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions" packet in order to grade questions 1-4, which were due today The answers for 1-4 can be found here.  If classes still needed to finish discussing the notes in the "The Shot Heard Round the World" packet, we also finished with those.

    We then started notes called, "Men Who Influenced the Declaration of Independence."  We watched a short video clip about John Locke.  (The video came from The Biography Channel's "Biography of the Millennium," which listed the 100 most influential people of the last 1000 years.  Locke is number 18 on that list.)  We then discussed Locke's views and took notes on them.

    Quiz and "Shot Heard Round the World", cont.- Friday, January 4, 2019

    First, students took the quiz about things we've covered this week.  It emphasized the strengths and weaknesses that each side had at the start of the war, and also had a few review questions from the quiz before Christmas.  

    We then continued taking notes in the "The Shot Heard Round the World" packet that they received yesterday.  Most classes got a chance to watch the video again, and then we talked about battles like Bunker Hill, Saratoga, and Yorktown. 

    For homework, students should read pages 149-152, and then answer question 1-4 of the packet called "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions."  These four question will be due on Monday, Jan. 7th.

    Today was the last day to hand in the "Christmas in the Colonies" crossword puzzle for extra credit.

    "The Shot Heard Round the World"- Thursday, January 3, 2019

     We reviewed the strength and weaknesses of the British and the American colonies at the start of the Revolutionary War.  We also added to the notes on the page called Britain v the Colonies, 1775.  We asked which side seemed to be the strongest at the start of the war, and most students agreed that the British looked like they were going to win.  We also asked what the American colonies could do to make up for their weaknesses.  If France came in on the colonists' side, they could bring what the colonies needed- men, supplies, money, a navy, and so forth.  But convincing France to help out at all would be a challenge.  We also looked at a cartoon that compared the two sides.  It made an allusion to the story of David and Goliath.  The British might look like a giant, but the little colonies will probably find a way to win this war.

    We then watched a video clip from Schoolhouse Rock called, "The Shot Heard Round the World."  We watched the video twice, and the second time, students tried to take notes in the "The Shot Heard Round the World" packet that they received today.  We will continue talking about this video after the quiz tomorrow, because it manages to mention every battle that 7th graders need to know about (except one, which we will mention tomorrow).

    Students should note that there will be a quiz tomorrow, which will concentrate on the strengths and weaknesses of the two sides, but may also have review questions on it from the material we had on the last quiz. 

    For homework, students should read pages 149-152, and then answer question 1-4 of the packet called "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions."  These four question will be due on Monday, Jan. 7th.

    The "Christmas in the Colonies" crossword puzzle is extra credit and is due on Friday, January 4 (tomorrow!). No late crossword puzzles will be accepted because they are extra credit. 

    Strengths and Weaknesses- Wednesday, January 2, 2019

    We started the day by going over the quiz that was taken before break, as well as the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet, which Mr. Frank graded over break.  We then begin looking at the strengths and the weaknesses of the two sides at the start of the Revolution.  Answers for part 1 can be found here.  Answers for part 2 can be found here.  We compared pictures of Colonial soldiers and British soldiers, and took notes on a page called, Britain v the Colonies, 1775.

    Students should note that there will be a quiz this Friday, which may have review questions on it from the material we had on the last quiz. 

    For homework, students should read pages 149-152, and then answer question 1-4 of the packet called "Fighting the Revolution- Homework Questions."  These four question will be due on Monday, Jan. 7th.

    The "Christmas in the Colonies" crossword puzzle is extra credit and is due on Friday, January 4. No late crossword puzzles will be accepted because they are extra credit. 

    Christmas Break- Monday, Dec. 24, 2018- Tuesday, January 1, 2019

    Quiz and Christmas Crossword- Friday, Dec. 21, 2018

    Mr. Frank collected the homework packet called the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet.  We have been working on this piece by piece for more than a week, and the entire packet, questions 1-15, was due today.  

    Students had the weekly quiz.  It covered the Causes of the Revolution notes as well as the reading that we had in the textbook for the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet.

    After the quiz, students were able to work on the "Christmas in the Colonies" crossword puzzle.  It has an accompanying article that tells about how Christmas was celebrated in the Thirteen Colonies.  This puzzle counts as extra credit and is due on Friday, January 4 (though some students were able to hand it in today).

    Lexington and Concord- Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018

    Mr. Frank checked the homework that was due today (Questions 10-13 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet), and answered any questions that students might have about it.

    We reviewed the Intolerable Acts, which was the British plan to punish the colonists for the Tea Party.  We also reviewed how the First Continental Congress met and encouraged colonies to organize their militias.  These situations set the stage for Paul Revere's ride and the battles of Lexington and Concord-- the "Shot Heard Round the World."  We finished these sections in the Causes of the Revolution notes.  In most classes, we also viewed video clips from the History Channel about Lexington and Concord.

    For homework, students do questions 14-15 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet.  The entire packet will be due tomorrow, Friday, Dec. 21.  Students should also remember that there is a quiz about the Causes of the Revolution notes.

    The Intolerable Acts- Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2018

     We started listening to (or in later classes, actually singing the song "The Rich Lady Over the Sea," and we discussed the symbols in the song and how it represented the Boston Tea Party.  We continued with our notes on the Causes of the Revolution and discussed the Intolerable Acts (aka, the Coercive Acts) that were meant to be punishment for the colonies.  We concluded by seeing how the First Continental Congress met, and we discussed the various ways that they decided to act, including organizing the militia.

    For homework, students should read section 3.3 (p. 141-149) in their textbooks, and then do questions 10-13 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet for Thursday.  The entire packet will be due on Friday, Dec. 21.

    The Tea Act- Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018

    Mr. Frank checked the homework that was due today (Questions 7-9 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet), and answered any questions that students might have about it.

    We then continued with our notes on the Causes of the Revolution.  We reviewed what happened at the Boston Massacre (according to the Americans and according to the British) and saw examples of pictures that students had made in earlier years to illustrate the two sides.  We saw that the Townshend Acts were repealed, but that they were replaced with the Tea Act.  We discussed boycotts and why they worked.  We examined the picture called, "Bostonians Paying the Excise Man," and determined that it must have been made by the British because it make the colonists look out of control and scary.  We made it as far as the Boston Tea Party in our notes and discussed why the colonists would have dressed as Indians.

    For homework, students should read section 3.3 (p. 141-149) in their textbooks, and then do questions 10-13 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet for Thursday.  The entire packet will be due on Friday, Dec. 21.

    Boston Massacre- Monday, Dec. 17, 2018

    Mr. Frank checked the homework that was due today (Questions 1-6 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet), and answered any questions that students might have about it.

    We then saw a brief clip from the History Channel video, America: The Story of Us.  The clip set up the tensions in Boston that led to the Boston Massacre.  We took some brief notes about the Boston Massacre in our notes on the Causes of the Revolution.  Then we examined some accounts from the time.  Mr. Frank read a long excerpt from Captain Thomas Preston's testimony that he gave in court.  We then compared what Preston had said to the famous picture that Paul Revere drew of the event and we found that there were many differences.    We discussed which of these versions is most likely to be closest to the truth, and the we watched the video's version of what happened.

    For homework, students should read section 3.2 (p. 130-140) in their textbooks, then do questions 7-9 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet for Monday.  The entire packet will be due on Friday, Dec. 21.

    Causes of the Revolution- Friday, Dec. 14, 2018

    We continued with our notes on the Causes of the Revolution by reviewing how the colonists were angry about taxation without representation.  We looked at the reactions to the Stamp Act, including the Stamp Act Congress and the riots in several cities.  We discussed the Townshend Acts, and saw how they resulted in smuggling and the Writs of Assistance.  Eventually, since more colonists felt that something bad was coming, the colonial assemblies formed committees of correspondence to keep each other informed.  Meanwhile, tensions were rising in Boston.

    For homework, students should read section 3.2 (p. 130-140) in their textbooks, then do questions 1-6 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet for Monday.  The entire packet will be due on Friday, Dec. 21.

    Taxation Without Representation- Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018

    First, we went over the tests that students took yesterday, and discussed any questions that students may have had.  

    Then, Mr. Frank "announced" the school's new policy to charge students 10 cents for each photocopy for classwork, quizzes, and tests.  He said that a vote was taken on the West side of town, and that we were going to be forced to do what they chose.  Students felt frustrated by this and discussed possible ways to get around the charge (using computers, printing things at home, etc.) as well as ways to protest (boycotts, strikes, etc.)  Mr. Frank told the classes that this 10 cent charge WAS NOT REAL and is not really going to be collected, but pointed out that they reacted in much the same ways that the colonists did.

    We then started taking notes on the causes of the American Revolution.  We got up to the Stamp Act and the main reason that colonists were mad about the taxes-- The taxes were Taxation without Representation.

    For homework, students should read section 3.2 (p. 130-140) in their textbooks, then do questions 1-6 in the Causes of the Revolution Homework packet for Monday.

    5-Week Test- Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018

    Students took the first 5-week test of the marking period today.  The test will count for 50% of the marking period grade at this point, and 25% of the grade by the end of the 2nd marking period.  It will cover material since the last 5-week test, namely the 13 British Colonies.  Students can find review material, including a study guide (with and without answers), and other links at the “Review Sites” page on the class website.  Remember, unlike quizzes, tests are not able to be retaken.

    Review for test- Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018

    We played a review game on the Kahoot website to get ready for tomorrow's test.

    The test will count for 50% of the marking period grade at this point, and 25% of the grade by the end of the 2nd marking period.  It will cover material since the last 5-week test, namely the 13 British Colonies.  Students can find review material, including a study guide (with and without answers), and other links at the “Review Sites” page on the class website.  Remember, unlike quizzes, tests are not able to be retaken.

    French and Indian War, conclusion- Monday, Dec. 10, 2018

    First, we went over the quiz that students took on Friday.

    After that, we concluded our notes on the French & Indian War.  We talked about the year of victories for the British- 1759- when they won battles at Fort Niagara and Quebec, and made it almost impossible for the French to supply their forts on the Great Lakes.  The Battle of Quebec became a turning point in the war.  We then looked at the terms of the Treaty of Paris, where the French lost all of their lands in North America and the British gained most of it.  We concluded with a look at how the war affected different groups- the French speakers in Quebec, the Native Americans, the British and the colonists.

    Students should remember that we will be having a major test on Wednesday this week.  Students are invited to bring a phone to class if they want to try to use it for the Kahoot review game on Tuesday.  Students who don't bring a phone will be able to use the Chromebooks for the game like we usually do.

    Quiz, and French & Indian War, cont.- Friday, Dec. 7, 2018

    First students took the weekly quiz, which covered the material from this week, including the "Colonial Governments" (Front of page --  Back of page) and the French & Indian War.

    After the quiz, we continued taking notes on the French & Indian War.  Specifically we looked at the reasons that the colonies unanimously rejected the Albany Plan of Union.  First, they knew that the British king would send soldiers to help them against the French, because the king believed in mercantilism.  Second, none of the colonies wanted to give up power to a confederacy.

    If time allowed, we also watched a clip from a video called, Fort Niagara: The Struggle for a Continent.  The video looks at the 1759 Siege of Fort Niagara, when the British managed to capture the fort from the French.  This event helped shift the momentum of the war and helped the British win.

    There is no written homework for the weekend, but students should remember that there is a major test coming on next Wednesday, Dec. 12th.

    Superintendent's Staff Development Day- Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018- No school for students.

    French & Indian War- Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018

    We started taking notes on the French & Indian War.  We talked about how it was a war between the British, on one side, and the French & Indians on the other.  We looked at how the Ohio River Valley was a focus that the British were trying to move into and that the French were trying to defend.  We saw how George Washington helped start the war near what is now Pittsburgh, PA, and we saw how been Franklin suggested that the colonies form a confederacy in the Albany Plan of Union.  We also dissected Ben Franklin's "Join, or Die" cartoon.

    Friday's quiz will cover material from the "Colonial Governments" (Front of page --  Back of page) and the first two pages of the French & Indian War.

    Colonial Governments- Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018

    We started with a "pop quiz" about the three branches of government.  On a half sheet of paper, students wrote the names of each of the branches and their jobs.  We exchanged papers and graded each other's.  (The quiz will not count for a grade, this time, but is practice for students to see what they have to study.)

    We then continued with notes about the colonial governments, and finished the notes called the "Colonial Governments" (Front of page --  Back of page).  We looked at how the colonial assemblies, like the House of Burgesses in Virginia, were the parts of the government that were most representative of what the people wanted.  The governors, in the Executive Branch, were usually appointed by someone in Britain.  Not all colonists could vote.  You had to be a free white man over 21 who owns land and in some colonies you also had to be a member of a particular church.  That still meant that there were more people able to vote in the colonies than anywhere in Europe.

    British Government- Monday, Dec. 3, 2018

    First, we went over the questions from the quiz that students took last Friday, about the economics of the 13 colonies.  

    Today, we started notes on the "Colonial Governments" (Front of page --  Back of page).  While taking these notes, we reviewed the three branches of government and their jobs.  The legislative branch makes or writes the laws; the executive branch enforces or carries out the laws; and the judicial branch interprets the laws.  We also reviewed how the branches look in the American government today- The legislative branch is Congress; the executive branch is headed by the President; the judicial branch is made up of courts.  On the back side of the notes, we looked at how those branches were in the British government of the 1700s (as well as the British government today).  

    Quiz and Middle Passage- Friday, Nov. 30, 2018

    Students took the weekly quiz, titled "Economics in the Colonies."   After the quiz we talked briefly about the nightmarish conditions that made up the so-called "Middle Passage" of the triangular trade route.  Students watched a brief video clip about the Middle Passage, which can be viewed here.  (This particular clip was made by the History Channel to accompany the recent production of Roots.)

    Mercantilism- Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018

    The class took notes on mercantilism.  We discussed what this economic theory meant and how it led European kings to desire to have colonies.  We looked at how the Navigation Acts were set up to help ensure that the British made a profit off of the colonies. We also looked at the specific example of the voyage of the Sanderson that made a circuit around the triangular trade route to beat the mercantilist system. 

    Slavery in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018

    Mr. Frank checked the Slavery in New York packet to make sure that students had attempted to answer the questions.  Then, we went over all of it, discussing answers as we went.  After we went over the packet, Mr. Frank collected them for a homework grade.

    Indentured servants vs. Slaves, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018

    Students had a Venn diagram for homework last night. The diagram compares indentured servants and slaves, and we discussed students' answers.

    We then continued with the video "Jill's Day" and finished discussing the questions about it.

    Students had a chance to start their homework.  Their homework, due tomorrow, is to complete the packet called "Slavery in New York."  We will be discussing their answers in class tomorrow.

    "Jill's Day"- Monday, Nov. 26, 2018

     First we started by completing the Southern Colonies notes.  We had already done most of them, but we still had to cover the "Indentured Servants," mentioned in the vocab section, and the chart comparing the regions that was on the last page of the 13 Colonies packet.

    We then started a video from the A Day in the Life series.  This episode is called "Jill's Day."  Jill is a field slave on one of the plantations near Williamsburg in the 1770s, and we followed her through her work and worries in a day.  

    For homework, students should try to complete the Venn Diagram that compares indentured servants and slaves, based on what we discussed in class today.  Students will have a chance to discuss their answers tomorrow.

    Thanksgiving Break- Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2018- Friday, Nov. 23, 2018-- No school

    "Dennis, Prissy and Tom's Day"- Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018

    We continued with the video called A Day in the Life.  This episode is called "Dennis, Prissy and Tom's Day."  Most classes finished with the video today and we discussed the answers to each of the questions.  (Note: 8th Period did not meet today because of the spirit assembly this afternoon.  8th period got a chance to watch the whole video yesterday instead, but we made time for it by not discussing the questions at all.)

    Finishing Southern Colonies notes- Monday, Nov. 19, 2018

    First, we went over any questions that students might have about the homework. the Geography Challenge- 13 Colonies, which is due tomorrow.  We also went over any questions that students might have had about the quiz that we took last Friday about the 13 English Colonies.

    We continued with the notes on the Southern Colonies, which included the terms, "slave codes," "gentry," and "apprentice."

    If time allowed, we started the video called A Day in the Life.  This episode is called "Dennis, Prissy and Tom's Day."  We didn't get very far in it, and will continue it tomorrow (except in 8th period). 

    For homework, students need to complete the activity that we started last Friday, called Geography Challenge- 13 Colonies. Please note: the assignment uses maps from the orange History Alive textbooks that are available in Mr. Frank's room (not the textbooks that students have at home).  The maps from that textbook can also be found here and here.  It is due tomorrow, on Tuesday, Nov. 20.

    Quiz and Geography Challenge- Friday, Nov. 16, 2018

    First, students took the quiz for this week.  It covered the three regions of the Thirteen English Colonies, including notes on New England, the Middle Colonies, and the Southern Colonies.

    After the quiz, students were able to start on their homework in class.  It is the Geography Challenge- 13 Colonies. Please note: the assignment uses maps from the orange History Alive textbooks that are available in Mr. Frank's room (not the textbooks that students have at home).  The maps from that textbook can also be found here and here.  If students did not finish it in class, the Geography Challenge is due on Tuesday, Nov. 20.

    Southern Colonies- Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018

    We finished up any notes that may have remained from the notes on the Middle Colonies, and then we took notes on the Southern Colonies.  We saw how the Mason-Dixon line became the unofficial border between the colonies that had a lot of slaves (in the South) and the colonies that had relatively few.   We briefly looked at how each of the five Southern colonies got started- Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia.  We also looked at the difference between the Tidewater region, where there were large plantations with many slaves, and the backcountry, where there were mainly small subsistence farms with few slaves.

    Tomorrow's quiz will cover all three regions of the Thirteen English Colonies, including notes on New England, the Middle Colonies, and the Southern Colonies.  A few review sites have been posted on this webpage to help students study.

    New England & Middle Colonies- Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018

    First, Mr. Frank collected the "Did Pocahontas save John Smith?" paragraphs.  Most people turned them in via Google Classroom, but some chose to write it out on paper.  Either way, Mr. Frank also collected the  the packet called "Did Pocahontas Save John Smith?" and the writing organizer, which will also be part of the grade.

    We then continued to take notes on the New England Colonies.  Specifically, we saw how the colony of Massachusetts came first, and the other three New England colonies "spun off" of it.  Connecticut wanted to limit the power of the governor, Rhode Island wanted separation of Church and State, while New Hampshire just wanted to fish.  We then started taking notes on the Middle Colonies.  Classes got to different places, but most classes reviewed how New York started as a Dutch colony with patroons as the major land holders.  We also looked at William Penn's colony of Pennsylvania was founded on Quaker beliefs and became a tolerant, diverse, and fast-growing place because of that.  We will continue with these notes tomorrow.

    New England Colonies- Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018

    We went over the quiz on the First English Settlements that we did on Friday.  

    We then started to take notes on the New England Colonies.  These notes included defining what a "colony" is, a look the economics of New England (If they can't be farmers there, what could they do?), and a quick look at how Puritans and town meetings set the stage for a lot of the character of the New England colonies.  We will continue with these notes on Wednesday.

    Students should remember that their paragraph on "Did Pocahontas save John Smith?" is due tomorrow, Wednesday, Nov. 14.

    Veterans Day- No School- Monday, Nov. 12, 2018

    Did Pocahontas Save John Smith- Writing day- Friday, Nov. 9, 2018

    First, students took the weekly quiz.  It covered the First English Settlements packet and the Venn diagram that we created together about Jamestown and Plymouth.

    After the quiz, students wrote paragraphs to answer the question, "Did Pocahontas Save John Smith."  The paragraphs were based on the packet called "Did Pocahontas Save John Smith?" and the writing organizer.  Students could use Google Classroom to write with, or they could use old-fashioned pen and paper, whichever they preferred.  The paragraphs should have: 

    1. T= A topic sentence
    2. E= Evidence 
      at least 3 pieces of evidence- facts, quotes or paraphrasing.
      1 must be from a primary source of John Smith's;
      1 must be from an historian- Adams, Lewis, Lamay or Barbour
    3. A= Analysis= Reasoning. 
      "This shows...," "Therefore...," etc.
      at least 2 sentences

    And of course, the paragraphs should use correct grammar, punctuation, capitalization and spelling.  The paragraphs are due by Wednesday, November 14.

    Did Pocahontas Save John Smith?- Day 2, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018

    Mr. Frank checked the homework from the packet called "Did Pocahontas Save John Smith?".  Students should have read and answered the questions about sources 1.3-1.6. We then discussed each of these historians, and looked at the evidence and reasoning that they offered about the question, "Did Pocahontas save John Smith?"

    For tonight's homework, students received a writing organizer to help them prepare to write a paragraph about their opinion, "Did Pocahontas save John Smith?"  Completing the organizer is required, but it should also make the writing process easier.  

    Tomorrow's quiz will cover the First English Settlements packet and the Venn diagram that we created together about Jamestown and Plymouth.  We will write the paragraphs after the quiz.

    Did Pocahontas Save John Smith?- Day 1, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018

    We talked briefly about the results of the mid-term elections that were held nationally yesterday.  The Democrats gained a majority in the House of Representatives while the Republicans kept their majority in the Senate.  Our own representatives in Congress stayed the same, as Kirsten Gillibrand won another term as a US Senator from New York and Democrat Brian Higgins remains in the House of Representatives for our Congressional district.  Andrew Cuomo won another term as governor of New York.

    Mr. Frank checked the homework (Tool 1.1 (the "Play-by-Play") and Tool 1.2 (the Venn diagram)) in the packet called "Did Pocahontas Save John Smith?"  We then read and discussed both of John Smith's accounts in detail, and created a "Play-by-Play" for the second account.  We then shared ideas for the Venn diagram comparing and contrasting the two versions.  

    For tonight's homework, students should read sources 1.3 through 1.6 in the "Did Pocahontas Save John Smith?" packet. These sources are historians and each one is discussing their answer to that question, did Pocahontas save John Smith?  Students should answer the two questions for each of these historians. Their answers will be checked tomorrow, and will be the basis for our class discussion and writing that we will do later in the week. (Students do NOT have to do the green, yellow, and pink highlighting that is mentioned at the bottom of each page.) 

    Superintendents Day- Teacher Staff Development.  No school for students- Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018

    First English Settlements, last day- Monday, Nov. 5, 2018

    To start with, we went over the Venn diagrams that students had done for homework which compared Jamestown and Plymouth.  Students were able to add to their diagrams and edit them while we created a group one on the Promethean Board.

    We took our last notes in the First English Settlements packet.  Today's notes concentrated on the Mayflower Compact.

    For homework, students received a writing packet called "Did Pocahontas Save John Smith?"  They should read Sources 1.1 and 1.2 and complete Tool 1.1 (the "Play-by-Play") and Tool 1.2 (the Venn diagram) for Wednesday.  We will be working in this packet for the rest of this week, with the idea in mind that we will be writing a paragraph as a final activity.  Students had a chance to get started on this work in most of the class periods today.

    Note: Monday, Nov. 5 is the first day of the 2nd marking period.  For earlier days, click here.