• Test- Friday, April 5, 2019

    Students took their 5-week test today.  It will be the last grade of the 3rd marking period.

    Review- Thursday, April 4, 2019

    In order to review for tomorrow's big test, we played a "Jeopardy-style" review game.  The categories were: Executive & Judicial Branches; Checks & Balances; Ratification & Bill of Rights; Washington & Adams; Jefferson.

    Note: Period 1 had to spend some time at the beginning of class going over material that was missed over the last two days, due to state testing.  We did not watch the videos that the other classes saw, but we did discuss the answers to the questions about the video.  We then tried to play Kahoot, but the website wasn't working very well.  We ended up playing the "Jeopardy-style" review game for about 15-20 minutes.

    Today is the last day for any redos, retakes or late work.  The last test of the marking period will be tomorrow.

    Thomas Jefferson & Lewis & Clark- Wednesday, April 3, 2019

    We finished the clips on Thomas Jefferson from the video from the History Channel called, The Presidents.  Students then answered questions about the video.

    When time allowed, we watched a brief preview of Lewis & Clark: A Film By Ken Burns, which is available on YouTube.  Since Period 3 had even more extra time, we also watched Lewis and Clark: An American Adventure Story.

    Thursday (tomorrow) is the last day for any redos, retakes or late work.  The last test of the marking period will be this Friday.

    NOTE: Because of the NY State ELA tests, classes were shortened today.  First period did not meet at all.

    Thomas Jefferson & Lewis & Clark- Tuesday, April 2, 2019

    We continued to take notes about Thomas Jefferson's presidency.  In most classes we reviewed the major points about the Election of 1800 and the case of Marbury v. Madison.  We reviewed the good things that America got from the Louisiana Purchase, and also why Jefferson was hesitant to buy it.  We then went into a few more details about the Lewis and Clark Expedition.  In some classes, we began watching the Jefferson portion from The Presidents, but most classes didn't get this far, and none of the discussed the questions about it.  We will get to those tomorrow.

    Thursday is the last day for any redos, retakes or late work.  The last test of the marking period will be this Friday.

    NOTE: Because of the NY State ELA tests, classes were shortened today.  First period barely met at all.

    Marbury v. Madison and Louisiana Purchase- Monday, April 1, 2019

    In honor of April Fool's Day, Mr. Frank distributed maps of the "Untied States"  [sic.]  The maps show the states flipped and moved, but their shapes are still more or less correct.  If students can correctly identify 40 or more states, Mr. Frank is offering this for extra credit.

    We went over the quiz from Friday and Part 2 of the "Principles of the Constitution in the News" projects.  Again, as with Part 1, if students wish to redo Part 2, Mr. Frank won't average the redo grade with the first attempt, so students could still earn 100% on it.

    We took notes on Thomas Jefferson's presidency.  Specifically, we looked at the topics of the case of Marbury v. Madison (which introduced the idea of judicial review) and the Louisiana Purchase (which doubled the size of the country).

    Thursday is the last day for any redos, retakes or late work, as well as the extra credit mentioned above.  The last test of the marking period will be this Friday.

    Quiz, Adams and Jefferson- Friday, March 29, 2019

     First, we took our weekly quiz, which covered Washington's presidency (including Hamilton v. Jefferson) and the presidency of John Adams.

    After the quiz, we finished up Adams's presidency by watching and/or discussing the History Channel video The Presidents, and used that to finish our notes on the Presidency of John Adams.  We then started to take notes on Thomas Jefferson and his presidency, starting with the controversial election of 1800.

    Students should remember that next week Friday is our 5-week test and the end of the 3rd marking period.  Thursday will be the last day for any redos, retakes or late work.

    John Adams- Thursday, March 28, 2019

    First, Mr. Frank collected the homework on the sheet called "What is the best way to make America become great?"  Students used the Promethean Board to drag descriptions to the side of Jefferson or Hamilton, which helped review their beliefs.  

    We took notes on the Presidency of John Adams, and especially the Alien & Sedition Acts that helped make Adams unpopular.  These acts led to the Kentucky and Virginia Resolution which introduced the idea that states could "nullify" a federal law.

    Hamilton v. Jefferson- Day 2- Wednesday, March 27, 2019

    We continued with our notes in the packet called, Jefferson v. Hamilton, and continued to discuss the differences in their views.  We also discussed details of Hamilton's financial plan, found on the last page of our packet.  We also listened to two songs from the Broadway show, Hamilton, "Cabinet Battle #1" which is about Hamilton's financial plan, and "Cabinet Battle #2" which is about the question of whether or not to support France in the coming war with Britain.

    For homework, students should be answer the questions on the page they received yesterday, "What is the best way to make America become great?"  The answers to these question and the accompanying paragraph are homework due tomorrow, Thursday.  (The questions go along with the article on page three of the Jefferson v. Hamilton packet.)

    The Presidency- George Washington- Tuesday, March 26, 2019

    Students watched a video from the History Channel called, The Presidency.  They viewed the clips that dealt with George Washington, and answered the questions on the last page of the packet called, George Washington's presidency.

    After watching the video and discussing the questions students began reading the article on page three of the packet called, Jefferson v. Hamilton.  Student then began answering the questions on the page they received today called, "What is the best way to make America become great?"  The answers to these question (and the accompanying paragraph) are homework due on Thursday.

    Note: Mr. Frank was out today for personal reasons.  

    Whiskey Rebellion and Jefferson v. Hamilton- Monday, March 25, 2019

    We went over the short quiz about the Bill of Rights that students took last week.  Then we worked with the Venn diagrams that compared the Whiskey Rebellion and Shays' Rebellion.  Students were supposed to have put several items into the Venn diagram for homework.  We then added to them as we shared our information.  

    We also started notes comparing Jefferson's views with Hamilton's views.  In each class, we were able to compare their views on several topics (on page 2 of the notes) but we will have more to do later this week.

    George Washington's Presidency- Friday, March 22, 2019

    Students took their weekly quiz, which covered the Bill of Rights.  

    We then took a look at George Washington's presidency.  We defined the word "precedent" as "an example that people follow," and then looked at several precedents that were set by George Washington, including using the term "Mr. President" to address the President, having a cabinet, only running for two terms, and avoiding "foreign entanglements."  We also reviewed Shays' Rebellion which happened when the Articles of Confederation was in place, and we learned new things about the Whiskey Rebellion, which happened when George Washington was President.

    For homework, students should use the Venn diagram in their notes to compare and contrast details about Shays' Rebellion and the Whiskey Rebellion.  We will be discussing these Venn diagrams on Monday.

    Bill of Rights and Review- Thursday, March 21, 2019

    Mr. Frank collected part 2 of the "Principles of the Constitution in the News" activity today.

    We continued with our quick examination of the Bill of Rights.  We continued from wherever we finished yesterday and finished the notes to the 10th Amendment.  

    We then watched a video called "An Almost Painless Guide to the Constitution," which can be seen on YouTube.  Students had questions about the video to answer as they watched, and this served as a conclusion to our unit on the Constitution.   We discussed the answers to these questions, as time allowed.

    There is a quiz tomorrow, which covers the Bill of Rights.

    Bill of Rights- Wednesday, March 20, 2019

    Students got back Principles of the Constitution in the News- Part 1, and Mr. Frank went over what he was thinking when each of the 31 headlines and how they could be used to represent the different principles.  If students want to redo part 1, Mr. Frank will grade the redo for full credit (as long as the student handed in the first part on time).  In other words, students can still get a 100% on part 1, and the first grade they got will be discarded instead of averaged in.  Mr. Frank also reviewed what is expected for part 2.  Part 2 is due tomorrow, Thursday.

    We then started notes on the Bill of Rights.  No class finished these notes today, but we did discuss the most important amendment- the First Amendment, and usually several more as well.  We will continue with these notes tomorrow.

    Principles of the Constitution in the News- Tuesday, March 19, 2019

    Students worked on what they needed to, using the Chrome books from the library.  Part 1 of the project is due today, and part 2 is due on Thursday.  Today is the last day we will be working on these in class.   See previous days or here for details.

    Principles of the Constitution in the News- Monday, March 18, 2019

    We started by going over the quiz that students took last Friday.  

    We then had time to work on the Principles of the Constitution in the News project.  Part 1, which uses the 31 news articles from Mr. Frank's website, is due tomorrow- Tuesday, March 19.  Mr. Frank gave directions today for part 2.  In part 2, students should find a news article of their own to show either the principle of "Checks and Balances" or the principle of "Federalism."  The article can come from any news source, but should reflect a news story from the past year.  Students should create an 8 1/2 x 11 poster showing how that article demonstrates that principle of the Constitution, and answers the "Who?" "What?" "Where?" "When?" "Why?" and "How?" questions.  More details on part 2 can be found here.

    Part 1 is due on Tuesday; part 2 is due on Thursday.  

    Quiz and Principles of the Constitution in the News- Friday, March 15, 2019

    Today's quiz included: Article II- the Executive BranchArticle III- The Judicial BranchArticles IV - VII and the Ratification debate between Federalists and Antifederalists, and the Federalism Venn Diagram.  

    When students finished with the quiz, they were able to work on the Principles of the Constitution in the News activity that we started yesterday.   Mr. Frank has found 31 news articles about recent events that show at least one principle.  Students should use these links to find examples that illustrate the principles of the Constitution- 1 example of federalism, 3 examples of separation of powers (one for each branch), 1 example of checks and balances and 1 example of either popular sovereignty or republicanism.  The page for the answers is found here: Principles of the Constitution in the News- Part 1.  This page is part one of a two-part project, and is due on Tuesday.  

    Principles of the Constitution in the News- Thursday, March 14, 2019

    The "Principles of the Constitution" that we have discussed in class can be seen every day in the news.  Mr. Frank has found 31 news articles about recent events that show at least one principle.  Students should use these links to find examples that illustrate the principles of the Constitution- 1 example of federalism, 3 examples of separation of powers (one for each branch), 1 example of checks and balances and 1 example of either popular sovereignty or republicanism.  The page for the answers is found here: Principles of the Constitution in the News- Part 1.  This page is part one of a two-part project, and is due on Tuesday.  We will be working on it in class tomorrow (after the quiz) and we will have instructions for part 2 on Monday.

    Students have a quiz tomorrow that covers everything we've had since the test on Tuesday, 3/5.  That includes: Article II- the Executive BranchArticle III- The Judicial BranchArticles IV - VII and the Ratification debate between Federalists and Antifederalists, and the Federalism Venn Diagram.  

    Federalism- Wednesday, March 13, 2019

    Mr. Frank collected the homework that was due today: the Constitution Homework, questions 4 and 5-12.  The answers to those questions can be found here.

    Students received a blank Venn diagram titled "Federalism."  We took turns having students come to the Promethean board to drag different items to their proper spots and discussed why they had to be "National Powers," "State Powers," or "Concurrent (Shared) Powers)"  Answers to the Federalism Venn Diagram are found here.  

    Note: Today, 7th and 8th graders went to the high school to see the performance of the musical Grease.  As a result, most classes were shortened, but all classes met.  Period 6 was a full length period, so after doing the Federalism diagram, we played a "Jeopardy"-style review game to review topics about the Constitution.

    Articles IV - VII and Ratification- Tuesday, March 12, 2019

    We continued our look at the Constitution by looking at Articles IV - VII.  Among other things, they set up an amendment procedure, to allow the Constitution to be fixed and be flexible.  They also set up a procedure for the Constitution to be ratified.  We also took notes on the ratification of the Constitution- the debate between the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists.  Federalists wanted a strong new national government and supported the ratification of the Constitution, but Anti-Federalists were afraid that the porridge was going to be too hot.  To get the Constitution to be ratified, Hamilton, Jay and Madison wrote the Federalist Papers and promised that a Bill of Rights would be in the amendments.

    For homework, students should read pages 210-218 in the textbooks that they have at home and do questions 4, and 7-12 in packet called The Constitution- Homework Questions, essentially finishing the packet.  The packet is due tomorrow.

    Article III- Judicial Branch- Monday, March 11, 2019

    Mr. Frank collected the sheet called "Checks and Balances," which was homework for over the weekend if it wasn't done in class on Friday.

    Today, we took notes on Article III- The Judicial Branch.  We saw how Article III doesn't have many details and is quite short compared to the first two articles.  Most of the details were left up to Congress.  We also looked at a case as an example of how cases move through the system, to sometimes end up at the Supreme Court.  This case was the case of Tinker v. Des Moines School District.  Mary Beth Tinker and several other students brought something to school and got in trouble for it.   Our classes today played a game like Twenty Questions in order to figure out what it was that they brought.  (It was black armbands to protest American involvement in the Vietnam War.)  The question of free speech in schools was decided in this case in the Supreme Court in 1969.

    For homework, students should read pages 210-218 in the textbooks that they have at home and do questions 4, and 7-12 in packet called The Constitution- Homework Questions, essentially finishing the packet.  The packet is due Wednesday.

    How We Elect a President- Friday, March 8, 2019

    We finished up our notes on Article II- the Executive Branch.  We reviewed the roles that a President has (and finished those notes if we hadn't yet).  Then we paired some roles and departments together that usually work together-  For example, the Commander-in-Chief always works with the Department of Defense, and the President in the role  Chief Diplomat always works with the Department of State.  We then looked at how Americans elect a President, with an discussion of the Electoral College.  We saw how it is possible to get more people to vote for you across the country (i.e.., to win the "popular vote) but to still lose in the Electoral College, and that has happened several times in American history, including recently.

    Students received a sheet called, "Checks and Balances," which has a short homework assignment on it.  Students who finished in it in class handed it in today, but students who did not finish it in class should hand it in on Monday. 

    Also for homework, students should read pages 210-218 in the textbooks that they have at home and do questions 4, and 7-12 in packet called The Constitution- Homework Questions, essentially finishing the packet.  The packet is due Wednesday, March 13.

    Executive Branch, continued- Thursday, March 7, 2019

    We continued to take notes on Article II- the Executive Branch.  We reviewed the requirements to be President, and we discussed the various Departments in the Executive Branch, including the Department of State, the Department of Defense, the Department of the Treasury and the Department of Homeland Security.  Most classes got as far as the many "hats" that the President has to wear in his job, but still have more notes to take tomorrow.

    For homework, students should read pages 210-218 in the textbooks that they have at home and do questions 4, and 7-12 in packet called The Constitution- Homework Questions, essentially finishing the packet.  The packet is due Wednesday, March 13.

    Article II- the Executive Branch, day 1- Wednesday, March 6. 2019

    First, we went over the test that students took yesterday.  Students could not keep the test yet, because there are some people who haven't taken it, but students were able to see their test and ask about questions that they missed.

    We then started taking notes on Article II- the Executive Branch.  We did not get very far in the notes, and we will continue with them tomorrow.

    For homework, students should read pages 210-218 in the textbooks that they have at home and do questions 4, and 7-12 in packet called The Constitution- Homework Questions, essentially finishing the packet.  The packet is due Wednesday, March 13.

    Test- Tuesday, March 5, 2019

    Students took their first 5-week test of the 3rd marking period today.  Because the mid-term is also a 3rd marking period grade, there will be 3 test scores this marking period instead of the usual two.  It will eventually count for 20% of the 3rd marking period grade.  It covered all of the topics that we’ve had since the start of this marking period, including the Articles of Confederation, the New York State Constitution of 1777, the Constitutional Compromises, the Principles of the U.S. Constitution, the Preamble, and Article I (the Legislative Branch). 

    Review- Monday, March 4, 2019

    We began by discussing the questions that students may have had about the quiz that they took last Friday.  We also went over the answers for questions 1,2,3,5,6 from the Constitution- Homework Questions, which were due last Friday.   Before students handed in the homework that was due today, (questions 1-8 of the How a Bill Becomes a Law notes) we answered questions that students may have had about them.

    With whatever time was left after all of that we played an online review game, either "Kahoot" or "Quizlet Live" depending on the class period.  Our big 5-week test is one week from today, on Tuesday, March 5.  Review materials and a study guide have been posted here.

    Quiz and How a Bill becomes a Law- Friday, March 1, 2019

    Mr. Frank collected the homework that was due today- questions 1,2,3,5, and 6 of The Constitution- Homework Questions.  Students also took the weekly quiz which covered material on the Preamble and Article I.

    After the quiz we watched, "I'm Just A Bill" from Schoolhouse Rock.  Students had a sheet of questions to answer about it as we watched.  We started to discuss those questions afterward, but every class will have more to talk about on Monday.  

    For homework, students should answer questions 1-8 from the "Homework questions" on the back of today's sheet.  The answers to most of the questions can be found in the diagram at the top of that page.  Their answers are due Monday, and should be done on a separate sheet of paper.

    Our big 5-week test is one week from today, on Tuesday, March 5.  Review materials and a study guide have been posted here.

    Article I- Legislative Branch (Day 2)- Thursday, February 28, 2019

    Students then continued taking notes on the Legislative Branch.  If we hadn't finished the notes on the Senate, we started there.  We also discussed the Enumerated Powers, the Elastic Clause and the Committee System.

    For homework, students should read pages p. 203-210 in their textbooks.  They should then do questions 1,2,3,5 and 6 in The Constitution- Homework Questions.  (They can skip question 4 for now. We will be coming back to it later.  ** Note: This means about half of the packet will be done for tomorrow.)  These answers are due tomorrow, Friday March 1. 

    There will be a quiz on Friday this week, and our big 5-week test is one week from today, on Tuesday, March 5

    Article I- Legislative Branch- Wednesday, February 27, 2019

    Mr. Frank collected the Preamble Scramble which was homework due today.  We reviewed the six goals listed in the Preamble.

    Students then started taking notes on the Legislative Branch.  We looked at details about the House of Representatives and started to talk about the Senate.   

    For homework, students should read pages p. 203-210 in their textbooks.  They should then do questions 1,2,3,5 and 6 in The Constitution- Homework Questions.  (They can skip question 4 for now. We will be coming back to it later.)  These answers are due on Friday.

    There will be a quiz on Friday this week, and our big 5-week test is one week from today, on Tuesday, March 5

    Preamble- Tuesday, February 26, 2019

    It's been a while since we've had school, so we had to shake some of the cobwebs off today.  We went over the quiz that we took on Friday 2/15, the last day we were together.  If time allowed, we also went over the questions from the Liberty's Kids episode that we watched that day. 

    We then started our notes about the Constitution itself, and began with The Preamble.  First, we defined the word "Preamble" and a few other words like "Domestic" and "Tranquility" that are used in it.  We then watched the School House Rock video called "The Preamble" and watched it a second time if possible.  We then went through the words of the Preamble itself, and looked at each of the six goals that it lists for this new government, i.e. to form a more perfect union, to establish justice, to insure domestic tranquility, to provide for the common defense, to promote the general welfare, and to secure the blessings of liberty.

    For homework, students have the Preamble Scramble on the back of their Preamble notes.  This puzzle is kind of like a cross between a word search and a maze.  If they start on the "W" near the top left, they should be able to trace out all of the words to the Preamble in order as they work their way through the puzzle.  Sometimes the path will make a 90 degree turn, and sometimes the turn will come in the middle of a word, but  they should be able to trace the path that has the Preamble's words without lifting their pencil.  This assignment is due tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb. 27.

    There will be a quiz on Friday this week, and our big 5-week test is one week from today, on Tuesday, March 5.

    No School- "Wind Day"- Monday, February 25, 2019

    No School- February Break- Monday, February 18- Friday, Feb. 22, 2019

    Quiz and Liberty's Kids- Friday, February 15, 2019

    Students took the weekly quiz today, which covered the notes on Constitutional Compromises and  the Principles of the Constitution.  With what time remained, we watched an episode of Liberty's Kids called "We the People."  The characters visit the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and witness the Great Compromise being made.  Students had guiding questions to answer as they watched, but it did not count as a grade.

    Principles of the Constitution- Day 2- Thursday, February 14, 2019

    We continued to take notes in the page we're calling their "new best friends," otherwise known as Binder Page #71, the Principles of the Constitution.  We reviewed the principles that we covered yesterday- popular sovereignty, republicanism, federalism, and separation of powers.  We continued by looking at checks and balances.  We saw how each branch had power to check the other two, and examined examples of checks and balances like vetoes (executive over legislative), overrides (legislative over executive), impeachments (legislative over executive and judicial), and judicial review (judicial over legislative and executive).  We revisited the idea of "limited government", and looked at the idea of "individual rights" included in things like the Bill of Rights.

    There is no written homework, but students should be reviewing for tomorrow's quiz.  They should read "Our System of Government" in the "best friend" packet.

    Principles of the Constitution- Day 1- Wednesday, February 13, 2019

    Today, students were introduced to their "new best friends," otherwise known as Binder Page #71, the Principles of the Constitution.  Over the next month, students should rely heavily on the details in this page.  They should expect to refer to it a lot in class, and know it well.  This binder page even has its own "Fakebook" page.

    We started discussing the details of the seven principles of the Constitution in that page.  First we saw how "popular sovereignty" means that people have power, and it was the people who created this government (just like John Locke and the Declaration of Independence said).  Second, we noted hoe the United States is a "republic" and our form of "republicanism" means that we elect representatives to make and enforce the laws for us.  Third, we learned how our system of "Federalism" divides power between the national (i.e. Federal) and state governments.  We also reviewed how the "separation of powers" separates power between the legislative, executive and judicial branches.

    There is no written homework, but students should be reviewing for Friday's quiz.  They should read "Our System of Government" in the "best friend" packet

    Constitutional Compromises- Tuesday, February 12, 2019

    Mr. Frank collected the "Comparing Governments" chart that was due today.  We then continued with our notes on Constitutional Compromises.  We reviewed the story of Goldilocks and the Three Governments from yesterday, and the details of the Great Compromise.  We then looked at how the census was required to be done every ten years in order to determine states' votes in the House of Representatives.  We also looked at the 3/5 Compromise and the compromise on the Slave Trade.

    The Great Compromise- Monday, February 11, 2019

    First, we went over the quiz and any questions that students had from it.  

    Second, we heard the story of "Goldilocks and the Three Governments."  The First Government, under the British, was too "hot" or too powerful.  The Second Government, under the Articles of Confederation, was too "cold," or too "weak."  The third government, under our Constitution was "just right," but the recipes had to be figured out by the framers at the Constitutional Convention in 1787. 

    We then looked at the Constitutional Compromises that helped to make the new government "just right."  The first compromise that we talked about was the Great Compromise.  Big states like Virginia wanted the vote in the Congress to be based on states' populations- more people = more votes.  Small states, like New Jersey, wanted the vote in Congress to be equal for every state.  The Great Compromise between these was to have two houses in Congress- a Senate where each state gets two votes, and the House of Representatives, where the vote would be based on population.  We will continue with these notes tomorrow.

    For homework, students have the "Comparing Governments Chart" that they received on Friday.  Students can and should use their notes in their binder to complete this organizer.  Useful pages include: p. 41 (Colonial Governments), p. 43 (Quiz on Governments and the French & Indian War), p. 65 (Articles of Confederation) and p. 67 (New York State Government).  It is due tomorrow.

    Quiz- Friday, February 8, 2019 

    Students had a quiz today on the Articles of Confederation and the New York State government.  After the quiz, we completed any part of the New York State government notes that might have been left from yesterday.

    Students received a sheet called "Comparing Governments Chart."  They were able to work on it after we had gotten through everything else.  Students can and should use their notes in their binder to complete this organizer.  Useful pages include: p. 41 (Colonial Governments), p. 43 (Quiz on Governments and the French & Indian War), p. 65 (Articles of Confederation) and p. 67 (New York State Government).  Some students were able to finish this in class and handed it in.  Otherwise, it is due as homework for Tuesday.

    New York State Government- Thursday, February 7, 2019

    First, we talked abut the cartoons about the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, which had been corrected and returned to students today. 

    We then took notes on the New York State government- both the one that was formed by the New York State Constitution of 1777 and the one that we have today.  We looked at a few of the details about its three branches- the legislative, executive and judicial branches- and saw how the successful state constitutions were models for the new U.S. Constitution that had to replace the unsuccessful Articles of Confederation. 

    There is a quiz on this week's material tomorrow.

    Shays' Rebellion and the Successes of the Articles of Confederation- Wednesday, February 6, 2019

    If they had not handed them in yesterday, Mr. Frank collected the sheet about the cartoons about the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.

    Students then finished the notes in the Articles of Confederation packet.  We talked about the "straw that broke the camel's back," Shays' Rebellion, and about how it was what finally convinced people like George Washington that the Articles of Confederation had to be replaced.  We also took notes on the few successes of the Articles of Confederation which included the Treaty of Pairs, 1783, to end the Revolution, and the Northwest Ordinance, which helped organize the area north of the Ohio River into territories that would become five new states. 

    In period 6, we did what the other classes did yesterday.  Working in small groups, students examined 11 different cartoons about the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.  They had to write at least one complete sentence for each cartoon to explain what weakness was being shown.  Students were encouraged to use their notes from the Articles of Confederation packet to help them.  If students finished this sheet in class, they handed it in; if not, it is homework for tomorrow.

    Cartoons on the Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation- Tuesday, February 5, 2019

    Working in small groups, students examined 11 different cartoons about the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.  They had to write at least one complete sentence for each cartoon to explain what weakness was being shown.  Students were encouraged to use their notes from the Articles of Confederation packet to help them.  If students finished this sheet in class, they handed it in; if not, it is homework for tomorrow.

    Note: Period 6 was slightly different than the rest of the periods today.  In that period, students finished the notes in the Articles of Confederation packet.  Period 6 will be doing the cartoon activity tomorrow.

    The Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation- Monday, February 4, 2019

    Mr. Frank handed back the Enduring Issues cards that were collected a week ago (before the snow days).  We will be hanging them in the classroom, but Mr. Frank is offering students the possibility of redoing the cards for a better grade.  If a student does a redo on the card, the new grade will go into the grade book (instead of averaging it with the old grade like he would usually do).  If no enduring issues card was handed in, it can be handed in now, but for late credit.

    We continued in the Articles of Confederation notes.  More to be posted later.  We reviewed how the states wanted to keep power for the states themselves and only wanted to give the national government a very small amount of power.  However, that made the new government too weak to operate effectively.   Today, we took notes on how those weaknesses specifically looked, using the graphic organizer on page 3 of the Articles of Confederation notes.  We will be exploring these problems more tomorrow.

    There will be a quiz on Friday this week.

    Snow Days- No school- Wednesday, Thursday & Friday, January 30-31, & February 1, 2019

    The Articles of Confederation- Tuesday, January 29, 2019

    Students had a chance to see the midterm questions from yesterday, along with the answers they gave and were able to ask any questions that they had.  They were not able to keep these, though, and Mr. Frank collected them back again.

    We began our mini-unit on the Articles of Confederation, which was the first constitution for the United States.  It didn't last long because it had a number of problems, and understanding those problems can help students understand a bit about how and why our current Constitution is the way it is.  We began with a review of the Albany Plan of Union and the reasons why it was rejected.  When the Articles of Confederation were written, the colonies, now states, wanted to keep their decision making power and wanted the national government to be weak.  In most classes we got through the Articles of Confederation notes on page 1 and part of page 2.

    Midterm- Monday, January 28, 2019

    Students took the district midterm today.

    Mr. Frank also collected the crossword puzzle and the cards for the Enduring Issues- Midterm Activity, both of which were due today. 

    Note: Today is the first day of the 3rd Marking Period.

    Note: Monday, Jan. 28 is the first day of the 2nd marking period.  For earlier days, click here.