Advanced Placement Studio

  • AP Studio Art                   

    Introduction

    The AP Studio Art portfolios are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. The program demands significant commitment. Students will need to work outside the classroom, as well as in it, and beyond scheduled periods. Homework, such as maintaining a sketchbook or a journal, is a necessary component of instruction.

    AP Studio Art is not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year.

     AP Studio Art sets a national standard for performance in the visual arts that contributes to the significant role the arts play in academic environments. The submitted portfolios are reviewed by college, university, and secondary school art instructors using rigorous standards. This College Board program provides the only national standard for performance in the visual arts that allows students to earn college credit and/or advance placement while still in high school.

     

    The current portfolio offerings are 2-D Design and Drawing

     

    Instructional Goals

    • Encourage creative as well as systematic investigation of formal and conceptual issues.
    • Emphasize making art as an ongoing process that involves the student in informed and critical decision making.
    • Help students develop technical skills and familiarize them with the functions of the visual elements.
    • Encourage students to become independent thinkers who will contribute inventively and critically to their culture through the making of art.

     

    Portfolios are designed to allow freedom in structuring AP Studio Art courses while keeping in mind that the quality and breadth of the work should reflect first-year college-level standards.

     

    AP coursework should address and reflect three major concerns.

    1. a sense of quality in the work
    2. the student's concentration on a particular visual interest or problem
    3. the student's need for breadth of experience in the formal, technical, and expressive means of an artist. 

    Structure of the Portfolios

    Each portfolio requires submissions in three distinct sections. They are designed to assess different aspects of student performance. The sections require students to demonstrate quality, breadth, and an in-depth engagement in the process of making art. The three sections of the portfolio are:

    • Quality: the development of a sense of excellence in art; select works that best exhibit a synthesis of form, technique, and content
    • Concentration: an in-depth commitment to a particular artistic concern; demonstrate a depth of investigation and process of discovery
    • Breath: a variety of experiences in the formal, technical, and expressive means available to an artist; demonstrate a serious grounding in visual principles and material techniques

    All three sections are required and carry equal weight, but students are not necessarily expected to perform at the same level in each section to receive a qualifying grade for advanced placement.

    Section I – Quality

    (one third of total score)

    2-D Design Portfolio

    Drawing Portfolio

    3-D Design Portfolio

    5 actual works that demonstrate mastery of design in concept, composition, and execution.

     

    -           The works submitted may come from the Concentration and/or Breadth section, but they don't have to. They may be a group of related works, unrelated works, or a combination thereof.

    -           Quality refers to the total work of art. Mastery of design should be apparent in the composition, concept, and execution of works, whether simple or complex.

    -           There is no preferred (or acceptable) style or content

    5 actual works that demonstrate mastery of drawing in concept, composition, and execution.

     

    -           The works submitted may come from the Concentration and/or Breadth section, but they don't have to. They may be a group of related works, unrelated works, or a combination thereof.

    10 slides, consisting of 2 views each of 5 works that demonstrate mastery or three-dimensional design in concept, composition, and execution

     

    -           The works submitted may come from the Concentration and/or Breadth section, but they don't have to. They may be a group of related works, unrelated works, or a combination thereof.

    -           Quality refers to the total work of art. Mastery of 3-D design should be apparent in the composition, concept, and execution of works, whether simple or complex.

    -           There is no preferred (or acceptable) style or content

    Section II – Concentration

    (one third of total score)

    2-D Design Portfolio

    Drawing Portfolio

    3-Design Portfolio

    12 slides; some may be details

     

    -           A body of work investigating a strong underlying visual idea in 2-D design.

    -           A body of related works describing an in-depth exploration of a particular artistic concern. It should reflect a process of investigation of a specific visual idea.

    -           Exploration of a personal, central interest as intensively as possible using any medium that addresses two-dimensional design issues.

    -           Demonstrate growth and discovery through a number of conceptually related works.

    -           Evidence of student's thinking, selected methods of working, and development of work over time.

     

    Examples of Concentrations

    -           An exploration or pattern and designs found in nature and/or culture

    -           A series of works that begin with representational interpretations and evolve into abstraction

    -           A series of landscapes based on personal experience of a particular place in which composition and light are used to intensify artistic expression

    -           Design and execution of a children's book

    12 slides; some may be details

     

    -           A body of work investigating a strong underlying visual idea in drawing

    -           A body of related works describing an in-depth exploration of a particular artistic concern based around a single theme. It should reflect a process of investigation of a specific visual idea.

    -           Exploration of a personal, central interest as intensively as possible using any medium that addresses drawing issues.

    -           Demonstrate growth and discovery through a number of conceptually related works. Some concentrations involve sequential works, such as a series of studies that lead to, and are followed by, more finished works.

    -           Evidence of student's thinking, selected methods of working, and development of work over time.

     

    Examples of Concentrations

    -           A series of expressive landscapes based on personal experience of a particular place

    -           A personal or family history communicated through the content and style of still-life images

    -           Abstractions from mechanical objects that explore mark-making

    12 slides; some may be details or second views

     

    -           A body of work investigating a strong underlying visual idea in 3-D design

    -           A body of related works describing an in-depth exploration of a particular artistic concern. It should reflect a process of investigation of a specific visual idea

    -           Exploration of a personal, central interest as intensively as possible using any medium that addresses three-dimensional design issues.

    -           Demonstrate growth and discovery through a number of conceptually related works.

    -           Evidence of student's thinking, selected methods of working, and development of work over time.

     

    Examples of Concentrations

    -           A series of three-dimensional works that begin with representational interpretations and evolve into abstraction

    -           A series of site specific works that affect existing form and space

    -           Abstractions developed from natural or mechanical objects

    -           Figurative studies that emphasize expression and abstraction

     

    2-D Design Portfolio

    Concentration  examples (cont.)

    Drawing Portfolio

    Concentration examples (cont.)

    3-D Design Portfolio

    Concentration  examples (cont.)

    -           Development of a series of identity products (logo, letterhead, signage, etc) for and imaginary business

    -           A series of political cartoons using current events and images

    -           Interpretive portraiture or figure studies that emphasize dramatic composition or abstraction

    -           A series of fabric designs, apparel designs, or weavings used to express particular themes

    -           Interpretive self-portraiture and figure studies that emphasize exaggeration and distortion

    -           A project that explores interior or exterior architectural space, emphasizing principles of perspective, structure, ambiance created by light, etc.

    -           A figurative project combining animal and human subjects – drawings, studies, and completed works

    -           An interpretive study of literary characters in which mixed media, color, and form are explored

    -           The use of multiple images to create works that reflect psychological or narrative events

    -           Wheel-thrown and hand-built clay objects that allude to human, animal, or manufactured forms

    -           The use of multiple/modules to create and disrupt three-dimensional space

    -           A series of sculptures that explore the relationship between interior and exterior space

    Section III – Breadth

    (one third of total score)

    2-D Design Portfolio

    Drawing Portfolio

    3-D Design Portfolio

    12 slides; one slide each of 12 different works

     

    Work should demonstrate:

    -           a variety of concepts and approaches in 2-D design in which the elements and principles of 2-D design are the primary focus

    -           an understanding of the principles of design (unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale, and figure/ground relationships)

    -           exploration, inventiveness, and expressive manipulation of form, as well as compositional organization

     

    Work can be done using a single medium or a variety of media

     

    Examples

    -           Work that employs line, shape, or color to create unity or variety in a composition.

    -           Work that demonstrates symmetry/asymmetry, balance or anomaly

    -           Work that explores figure/ground relationships

    -           Development of a modular or repeat pattern to create rhythm

    -           Color organization using primary, secondary, tertiary, analogous or other color relationships for emphasis or contrast in composition

    -           Work that investigates or exaggerates proportion or scale.

    12 slides; one slide each of 12 different works

     

    Works should demonstrate a variety of concepts and approaches in drawing such as:

    -           Drawing form observation

    -           Work from invented or non-objective forms

    -           Effective use of light and shade, line quality, surface manipulation, composition, various spatial systems and expressive mark-making

     

    Examples

    -           Use of various spatial systems, such as linear perspective, the illusion of three-dimensional forms, aerial views, and other ways of creating and organizing space

    -           Use of various subjects, such as human figure, landscape, and still-life objects

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